The Four P's of Planting Native Seeds Part 3

June 16, 2017

By: Barb Holtz

Following directions may not be your forte. I hear you. Sometimes we need to heed a live-out-loud, throw-caution-to-the-wind attitude. So, you go girl (or boy) and wing it when constructing that IKEA furniture or getting your Iron Chef on. However, if you're planting a garden with native seed, let's color in the lines for a moment. There are four P's worth your attention in order to achieve your native paradise. We continue on with part three : PERSISTENCE.

The message here is short and sweet. If anyone tells you, "Native plant landscaping is no maintenance landscaping," they're lying. All landscapes change, especially those we manage for a desired result. 

Native plants are hearty, but pressure from invasive species, wildlife grazing and changes in weather patterns can take its toll. Weed out invasives and non-natives to nuture a diverse, healthy habitat. Don't look at it as work, but exploration! So, don those garden gloves and immerse yourself in nature's neighborhood. It's a community worth our attention and care. 

Some native landscapes benefit from burning or mowing once a year or every other year. I'm betting burning is frowned upon in most communities, so stick with the mowing option. (NECESSARY DISCLAIMER: Seriously, prairie burning is a science and requires extensive training and permitting. DO NOT SET FIRE TO YOUR YARD!) Mowing helps curb invasive species and woody invaders. Mow in the fall to benefit forbs (non-grass/sedge species) and in the spring to boost grass species.

To find out the fourth "P" you'll have to persist for one more week! Until then...Prairie On!